Ask the AWRI

Ask the AWRI articles are published in the Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker and are reproduced with permission from the publisher, Winetitles.

2018


Using composted grape marc in the vineyard (PDF)

Essling, M. Using composted grape marc in the vineyard. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (656) : 48-49; 2018.

Abstract: The AWRI helpdesk recently received a query from a grower who had applied composted grape mare at a rate of 70 cubic metres per hectare to their vineyard, but had some concerns as to whether this application would have an effect on fruit quality. The mare used had been composted for six years. This column explores some of the possible benefits and risks of using composted mare in vineyards.


Alcohol during pregnancy and breastfeeding (PDF)

Stockley, C.S. Alcohol during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (655) : 83-84; 2018.

Abstract: The AWRI helpdesk occasionally receives enquiries about drinking alcoholic beverages, including wine, during pregnancy and breastfeeding. This column provides answers to some key questions about the effects of alcohol on the developing foetus and child.


Lightstruck character (PDF)

Coulter, A. Lightstruck character. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (654) : 76-77; 2018.

Abstract: The AWRI sometimes receives enquiries regarding development of ‘lightstruck’ character in bottled wine during storage. This column provides a brief summary of this phenomenon.


Brown marmorated stink bug (PDF)

Longbottom, M. Brown marmorated stink bug. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (653) : p. 53; 2018.

Abstract: Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is an exotic pest, known to cause damage to a range of crops in other countries. This year dead and alive brown marmorated stink bugs (BMSBs) were detected in Australia in several shipping containers from Italy. The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources implemented off-shore treatment measures between January and April to ensure that the risk of more live BMSBs arriving in Australia was minimised. While this pest is currently not established in Australia, it is one of Australia’s top 40 high priority plant pests. This column provides answers to common questions about this bug, and why it should be taken seriously as a threat to Australian viticulture.


Understanding whole-bunch fermentation (PDF)

Godden, P. Understanding whole-bunch fermentation. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (652) : p. 63; 2018.

Abstract: During the 2016 and 2017 vintages, the AWRI made small-lot Pinot Noir and Shiraz wines from single batches of fruit, demonstrating the effects of changing one winemaking variable at a time. During tastings of those wines presented across Australia, many winemakers asked why there are such large sensory differences between wines made with 100% pure carbonic maceration and those made with the more common whole-bunch fermentation treatment. A previous ‘Ask the AWRI’ discussed carbonic maceration, and this one examines whole-bunch fermentation.


Carbonic maceration (PDF)

Cowey, G. Carbonic maceration. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (651) : 70-71; 2018.

Abstract: During the 2016 and 2017 vintages, the AWRI made small-lot Pinot Noir and Shiraz wines from single batches of fruit, demonstrating the effects of changing one winemaking variable at a time. During tastings of these wines presented across Australia, many winemakers have asked why there are such large sensory differences between wines made with 100% pure carbonic maceration and those made with the more common semi-carbonic maceration treatment or whole bunch fermentation. This column explores what is happening during carbonic maceration.


Spray drift (PDF)

Essling, M. Spray drift. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (650) : 34-35; 2018.

Abstract: Damage to grapevines caused by herbicides drifting onto vineyards from sprays conducted on nearby properties occurs occasionally in Australia. Queries about this issue, commonly known as ‘spray drift’, are received from time to time by the AWRI helpdesk. This column provides answers to some of the more common questions about this topic.


Wine instabilities – the solids won’t hurt you (PDF)

Stockley, C. Wine instabilities – the solids won’t hurt you. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (649) : p. 66; 2018.

Abstract: A range of hazes and deposits can form in wine and these can sometimes cause concerns for consumers. The AWRI helpdesk has recently received queries asking if there are any health risks associated with consuming wines affected by hazes or deposits. This column discusses the common instabilities seen in wine and provides reassurance that they do not pose health or safety risks.


Volatile acidity (PDF)

Coulter, A. Volatile Acidity. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (648) : p. 16; 2018.

Abstract: Analysis of volatile acidity (VA) was probably the wine industry’s first measure of wine quality and is routinely used as an indicator of wine spoilage. This column looks at some of the questions AWRI helpdesk staff commonly receive about VA.


2017


Biosecurity and viticulture (PDF)

Longbottom, M. Biosecurity and viticulture. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (647) : 44-45; 2017.

Abstract: Australia has a fortunate status as an island nation that is free of many pests and diseases found in other countries, but from time to time new issues are discovered. Most of these are not of major concern, but are nevertheless dealt with seriously to protect Australia’s valuable agricultural industries. This column presents answers to some common questions about Australia’s biosecurity management system.


Wine – a weighty issue (PDF)

Stockley, C. Wine – a weighty issue. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (646) : p. 44; 2017.

Abstract: The AWRI helpdesk often receives enquiries about the calorie content of wine and whether wine makes you ‘fat’. This column provides answers to some key questions about body weight and the consumption of alcoholic beverages.


Sooty mould (PDF)

Godden, P. Sooty mould. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (645) : 30-32; 2017.

Abstract: During the 2017 vintage, some wine-grape growers in several regions were severely affected by ‘sooty mould’. The thresholds for the presence of all moulds at which some wine producers downgrade or reject fruit is 3%, which means that there is potential for sooty mould to cause significant economic losses to grapegrowers. In addition, any effects of sooty mould on the composition and sensory qualities of wine are not well understood. This column provides answers to some common questions about sooty mould.


Vineyard snail control: exploring the options and the timing (PDF)

Essling, M. Vineyard snail control: exploring the options and the timing. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (643) : 46-47; 2017.

Abstract: Snails are a vineyard pest that can cause damage to buds and foliage, particularly during spring. This article provides answers to questions commonly raised with the AWRI helpdesk about controlling snails in vineyards.


The tricks and traps of deacidification (PDF)

Coulter, A. The tricks and traps of deacidification. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (642) : 56-57; 2017.

Abstract: The cooler than usual 2017 vintage resulted in some wines with higher titratable acidity (TA) levels than usual. In some cases, circumstances necessitated deacidification and winemakers contacted the helpdesk requesting advice. This column focuses on the chemical deacidification of wine using permitted carbonate salts.


Soil analysis and soil carbon: what should you be looking for when getting your soil tested? (PDF)

Longbottom, M. Soil analysis and soil carbon: what should you be looking for when getting your soil tested?. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (641) : 44-45; 2017.

Abstract: Soil sampling is a useful management tool that can be used prior to establishing a vineyard and also throughout the productive life of grapevines. Soil analysis can provide critical information about the key properties of soil, nutrient status, fertiliser requirements or to monitor the efficacy of soil amelioration, for example the addition of lime or gypsum.


Why was there more powdery mildew than usual this season? (PDF)

Essling, M. Why was there more powdery mildew than usual this season? Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (640) : 30-31; 2017.

Abstract: Powdery mildew is caused by the fungus Erysiphe necator (formerly Uncinula necator). Unlike most fungi, the powdery mildew fungus relies on wet weather for only a small part of its lifecycle. It usually develops in dry conditions but spreads most extensively at high humidity in mild, cloudy weather, inside shaded canopies. One reason for this is that the fungus grows on the surface of infected foliage and is retarded by direct exposure to sunlight.


Adding water to high sugar must (PDF)

Cowey, G. Adding water to high sugar must. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (639) : 88-89; 2017.

Abstract: In February, an amendment was made to the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code (FSC) to allow limited addition of water to high sugar must and juice to reduce the chance of fermentation problems. Previously water had not been allowed as a direct additive to grape juice, must or wine, with a maximum (cumulative) addition of 70 mL/L water allowable only for the incorporation of permitted additives or processing aids during the winemaking process.


Taints in wine (PDF)

Holdstock, M. Taints in wine. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (638) : p. 64; 2017.

Abstract: Each year the AWRI helpdesk investigates a range of taints in wines. In some of these cases, the taints cannot be remediated, and the wine is left unsaleable. It is therefore important to understand the more common sources of taints and take steps to avoid them. Some of the more frequent questions asked about taints are answered below.


Assessing and managing disease levels close to harvest (PDF)

Petrie, P. Assessing and managing disease levels close to harvest. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (637) : 32-33; 2017.

Abstract: This article looks at how to manage disease-affected grapes close to harvest.


Understanding molecular SO2 (PDF)

Coulter, A. Understanding molecular SO2. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (636) : p. 76; 2017.

Abstract: Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a key preservative used in winemaking, but how it works in wine is quite complicated. Concentrations of SO2 required to prevent microbial growth are often quoted as molecular SO2, but winemakers can be more familiar with discussing free and total SO2. This column brings together answers to some of the more common questions about the different forms of SO2 in wine, how much is needed and which factors can change its effectiveness.


2016


Grapevine tissue analysis (PDF)

Longbottom, M. Grapevine tissue analysis. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (635) : 36-37; 2016.

Abstract: Grapevine tissue analysis can provide critical information about vine nutrient status to assist with fertiliser decisions, problem diagnosis and monitoring the impacts of management practices. This article provides answers to some of the most common questions on this topic.


Wine consumption and brain health (PDF)

Stockley, C.S. Wine consumption and brain health. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (634) : p. 82; 2016.

Abstract: Research has recently been conducted on the effects of alcohol (and specifically wine) consumption on brain function, such as cognition and the risk of dementia. This article provides responses to some of the more common questions in this area.


Re-entry periods after vineyard sprays (PDF)

Essling, M. Re-entry periods after vineyard sprays. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (633) : p. 54; 2016.

Abstract: The 2016/2017 edition of Agrochemicals registered for use in Australian viticulture (also known as the ‘Dog Book’) for the first time features guidelines about re-entry into vineyards after agrochemicals have been applied. This column summarises some common questions about vineyard re-entry periods.


Calcium and its unpredictable presence (PDF)

Holdstock, M. Calcium and its unpredictable presence. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (632) : 68-69; 2016.

Abstract: Earlier in the year this column featured KHT deposits and cold stability. This month the focus is shifting to calcium instabilities, another type of deposit seen quite commonly by the AWRI helpdesk.


Not so pretty in pink (PDF)

Cowey, G. Not so pretty in pink. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (631) : p. 86; 2016.

Abstract: Pinking is a term used to describe the sudden and unexpected development of a salmon/bronze colour in white wines after bottling or when poured into a glass. Although the aroma and flavour of the wine generally remain unchanged, the pink colour often can be misconstrued as the brown colour more typically associated with wine oxidation. This appearance can subconsciously influence the consumers’ expectation of the taste of wine, with pink wines often considered oxidised. This article explains pinking and looks at its treatment and prevention.


Help! What cultivar (or clone) is this? (PDF)

Petrie, P. Help! What cultivar (or clone) is this? Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (630) : 40-41; 2016.

Abstract: While growers and winemakers generally know which grape cultivars they are growing or making into wine, there are a range of scenarios where it is important to be able to definitively identify a rootstock or scion. Accurate cultivar identification is essential for nursery operators as part of their quality assurance programs.


KHT deposits and cold stability (PDF)

Coulter, A. KHT deposits and cold stability. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (629) : p. 76; 2016.

Abstract: Potassium bitartrate (KHT) is the crystalline substance that drops out of solution when a wine is cold stabilised. However, if cold stabilisation is unsuccessful, wines can end up with KHT deposits after packaging and these represent around 25–35% of the AWRI helpdesk’s haze/deposit investigations each year. So why does this type of deposit continue to be an issue for the wine industry? The article addresses the following questions:

  • So what exactly is ‘cold stability’?
  • Which wine parameters affect ‘cold stability’?
  • Why does wine pH sometimes change during cold stabilisation?
  • What does the saturation temperature value for a wine mean?
  • Which ‘cold stability’ test does the AWRI recommend?

Grazing sheep in vineyards (PDF)

Essling, M. Grazing sheep in vineyards. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (628) : 46-47; 2016.

Abstract: It is becoming more common to see sheep grazing in Australian vineyards between late autumn and spring. This article addresses the most common questions asked by vineyard owners about this practice.

  • What are the benefits of grazing sheep in a vineyard?
  • When is the best time to graze sheep in the vineyard and how many should there be?
  • What savings can be expected in terms of operating costs and GHG emissions?
  • Is infrastructure needed?
  • Do agrochemical residues need to be considered?
  • Will the sheep cause damage in the vineyard?
  • Can any other types of animals be used in vineyards?

Health and nutrition labelling (PDF)

Stockley, C.S. Health and nutrition labelling. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (627) : p. 66; 2016.

Abstract: The AWRI helpdesk regularly receives questions about health and nutrition labelling for wine and wine products. Broadly the questions can be divided into the areas of alcohol, allergens, preservatives and health and nutrition statements, which all fall under the auspices of the Australia and New Zealand Food Standards Code. This article addresses some of the most common questions as outlined below.

  • How do I express alcohol content?
  • Which allergens do I need to label for?
  • Do I need to label for preservatives?
  • How do I calculate standard drinks?
  • Am I permitted to make health and nutrition statements?
  • What are the rules for cleanskins?

Predicting alcohol levels (PDF)

Cowey, G. Predicting alcohol levels. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (626) : p. 68; 2016.

Abstract: Over the past two vintages winemakers have been reporting higher than normal conversions of sugar to alcohol. One example was a must measured at 13.5 Baume that ended up with a 15% v/v alcohol concentration. Estimating potential alcohols based on grape must analysis is not as straightforward as many winemakers assume. This article addresses some key points to be taken into account.


Measuring canopy size (PDF)

Petrie, P. Measuring canopy size. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (625) : 36-37; 2016.

Abstract: Canopy size and density are important viticultural measures that relate to fruit quality. Traditionally, however, they have been difficult to measure. The University of Adelaide has recently released an app that allows growers to assess grapevine canopies using an iPhone or iPad. Some common questions about using the app are addressed in this article.


All things analysis (PDF)

Holdstock, M. All things analysis. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (624) : 52-53; 2016.

Abstract: Each year the AWRI helpdesk answers a number of enquiries about wine analysis including how to interpret a result or how to troubleshoot a laboratory issue. The questions and answers in this article represent some frequent and some more obscure questions received in the recent past.


2015


Skipping vineyard sprays in dry year (PDF)

Essling, M. Skipping vineyard sprays in dry year. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (623) : p. 38; 2015.

Abstract: The articles looks at strategies to control powdery mildew, downy mildew and botrytis during dry years.


Spoilage due to lactic acid bacteria (PDF)

Coulter, A. Spoilage due to lactic acid bacteria. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (622) : 76-77; 2015.

Abstract: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the microorganisms that conduct malolactic fermentation (MLF) in winemaking, but they can also cause wine spoilage. Some of the more common questions about LAB spoilage are discussed in this issue.


Nitrous oxide and viticulture (PDF)

Longbottom, M. Nitrous oxide and viticulture. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (621) : 42-43; 2015.

Abstract: Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the main greenhouse gases (GHGs) contributing to climate change. Over the past three years the AWRI has been working on a project to collect data on N2O emissions from vineyards across Australia and to investigate the effects of different vineyard floor management practices on N2O production.


DIY haze and deposit identification (PDF)

Cowey, G. DIY haze and deposit identification. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (620) : p. 87; 2015.

Abstract: A high proportion of questions answered and investigations conducted by the AWRI helpdesk are related to hazes and deposits in wine. While the helpdesk is well equipped to identify both common and unusual hazes and deposits, there are some steps that can be taken in the winery lab or kitchen to achieve a quick DIY identification.


Wine consumption and heart health (PDF)

Stockley, C. Wine consumption and heart health. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (619) : p. 72; 2015.

Abstract: A large amount of research has been conducted on the effects of alcohol (and specifically wine) consumption on the risk of cardiovascular disease. This column provides responses to some of the more common questions in this area.


Bunch stem necrosis (PDF)

Petrie, P. Bunch stem necrosis. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (618) : p. 36; 2015.

Abstract: Last season saw a spike in queries to the AWRI helpdesk about bunch stem necrosis (BSN), with incidence across most Australian regions. While the causes of BSN are not fully understood, this column summarises current knowledge about this disorder.


Trouble-free packaging (PDF)

Holdstock, M. Trouble-free packaging. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (617) : p. 92; 2015.

Abstract: The AWRI helpdesk team often receives questions about packaging and avoiding problems when wine goes from tank to bottle and beyond. Some of the more common ones are outlined below. How much SO2 is lost during packaging? I need to add some last minute copper sulfate to my wine, should I push my bottling date back? Do I need to cold stabilise again if I’m sweetening my wine up with grape juice concentrate just before bottling? After my wine was bottled with natural cork closures the bottles were left upright instead of inverted, is this standard practice? My empty glass bottles have been stored outside for a long time, is it still OK to use these? How useful is filterability testing prior to bottling?


Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) and viticulture (PDF)

Petrie, P. Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) and viticulture. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (616) : p. 47; 2015.

Abstract: Drones can be used to provide information about vineyards such as assessing for frost damage, water stress and missing vines or creating vigour maps.


Copper: friend or foe? (PDF)

Coulter, A. Copper: friend or foe? Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (615) : p. 73; 2015.

Abstract: Copper instabilities are one of the most common metal instabilities, mainly because of the low concentrations required to cause instability. Copper is also a catalyst for oxidation and reduction reactions and again, low concentrations can have an impact. Furthermore, copper reacts with thiols, so it can affect the varietal aromas of wines, especially those where thiols play a major role, such as Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Sauvignon.


Rainfall close to harvest (PDF)

Essling, M. Rainfall close to harvest. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (614) : p. 32; 2015.

Abstract: Heavy rain in the four-to-six weeks before harvest is always a risk to grape yield and quality. The ripening berry becomes increasingly susceptible to bunch rots as sugar level increases and fruit softens. High humidity and cloudy conditions provide ideal conditions for powdery mildew, but it is the bunch rots that are usually the most difficult to control.


Avoid mousy, off-flavours (PDF)

Cowey, G. Avoid mousy, off-flavours. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (613) : p. 50; 2015.

Abstract: Many winemakers are experimenting with new techniques in white winemaking such as high grape solids ferments, extended lees ageing, higher pH with minimal sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxidative ageing and minimal clarification or filtration. In many cases the aim of these practices is to produce white wines with more texture. While these changing practices have resulted in some great successes, they also come with some increased risks. The incidence of both ‘Brett’ and mousy characters in white wines submitted to the AWRI helpdesk is on the rise. Common questions about mousy off-flavour are explored below.


Effects of hot and dry conditions (PDF)

Longbottom, M. Effects of hot and dry conditions. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (612) : p. 38; 2015.

Abstract: Hot and dry conditions have been experienced across many Australian wine regions in recent years, resulting in a number of questions to the AWRI helpdesk.


2014


The power of pH (PDF)

Holdstock, M. The power of pH. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (611) : p. 72; 2014.

Abstract: A previous ‘Ask the AWRI’ column looked at acidity and answered the most common questions received about this parameter. This column considers the other equally, if not more, important partner – wine pH. Some winemakers believe this is the single most important analytical parameter to measure when making wine (closely followed by SO2).


Questions about drink driving (PDF)

Stockley, C.S. Questions about drink driving. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (610) : p. 66; 2014.

Abstract: Consumers and winemakers often ask questions about how their driving is affected when they drink a glass or two of wine. Why isn’t it safe to drink and drive? Like most countries, Australia has strict laws about drinking alcohol and driving. Across all states and territories, the legal limit for fully licensed drivers has been set at 0.05 blood alcohol concentration (BAC), which equates to 0.05 g of alcohol in a person’s body for every 100 mL of blood. This is the level above which the risk of being involved in a crash increases significantly. When behind the wheel of a vehicle, drivers need total concentration, good coordination, rapid reflexes and the ability to make correct judgements and decisions.


Export focus on residual metals (PDF)

Stockley, C.S. Export focus on residual metals. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (609) : p. 80; 2014.

Abstract: In March 2014, Wine Australia issued a warning to wine exporters regarding increased scrutiny of manganese, iron and copper levels in wine by Chinese authorities. Since then, the AWRI helpdesk has received a number of queries from grapegrowers and winemakers concerned about manganese in grapes and wine.


Acidity in all its various aspects (PDF)

Coulter, A.D. Acidity in all its various aspects. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (608) : p. 88; 2014.

Abstract: The AWRI often receives queries relating to various aspects of acidity. Given the importance of pH to the stability and development of wine and the importance of titratable acidity (TA) to wine’s sensory properties, this article answers some of the more common acidity-related questions.


Viticulture and greenhouse gas emissions (PDF)

Longbottom, M. Viticulture and greenhouse gas emissions. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (607) : p. 54; 2014.

Abstract: Grapegrowers across Australia are already feeling the impact of a changing climate with earlier budburst, shorter winters, compressed vintages and more frequent extreme weather events such as frosts, heat waves and bushfires. Questions and answers about greenhouse gases and climate change as they relate to viticulture are outlined below.


The ABCs of filtration and what works for you (PDF)

Cowey,G. The ABCs of filtration and what works for you. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (606) : p. 60; 2014.

Abstract: This article answers some of the more common questions about filtration including: What is the difference between absolute and nominal filter ratings? What is the difference between depth and surface filtration? Can I use cross flow for sterile filtration? What NTU level do I need for filtration? What level of filtration do I need? Does filtration strip out colour and flavour?


Can you achieve yield control in the vineyard without using bunch thinning? (PDF)

Dry, P. Can you achieve yield control in the vineyard without using bunch thinning? Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (605) : p. 40; 2014.

Abstract: This articles looks at alternative yield control methods like early leaf removal in the bunch zone and the application of an anti- transpirant spray to the whole canopy from the time of flowering.


Here’s the hot topics of vintage 2014 (PDF)

Holdstock, M. Here’s the hot topics of vintage 2014. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (604) : p. 79; 2014.

Abstract: The AWRI helpdesk has received more than 420 winemaking-related queries so far during the 2014 vintage. This article presents a snapshot of some of the ‘hot topics’ of 2014. The most frequent query topic to date has been smoke taint. It has been by far the biggest challenge of 2014, representing nearly 25 per cent of all calls received by the AWRI’s helpdesk during the early stages of vintage.


Bunches with ripe and unripe berries (PDF)

Dry, P. Bunches with ripe and unripe berries. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (603) : p. 49; 2014.

Abstract: This article presents the observations of the late Dr Bryan Coombe regarding the ‘sweet and sour’ disorder which Dr Coombe documented during 1999/2000 growing season.


Can ‘Brett’ affect white wines? (PDF)

Coulter, A. Can ‘Brett’ affect white wines? Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (602) : p. 54; 2014.

Abstract: It is well known that Brett spoilage can occur in red wines, however, can Brett spoilage also occur in white wines? The short answer is “yes”. The first case of Brett spoilage in a white wine investigated by the AWRI was in 2000, and there have been occasional cases investigated since then. However, an unusual trend has occurred recently with six cases of Brett in white wine investigated in the past six months. The level of 4-ethylphenol (4-EP), responsible for the Band-aid® aroma associated with Brett growth, ranged from 77 to 1320 ?g/L in these wines.


Canopy damage from herbicides? (PDF)

Essling, M. Canopy damage from herbicides Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (601) : p. 32; 2014.

Abstract: The AWRI’s viticulture team received a query at the start of flowering from a grower concerned about canopy damage observed in their vineyard. The description of the damage and the photographs provided pointed to herbicides as the likely cause of the problem.


Top tips for a successful yeast culture (PDF)

Cowey, G. Top tips for a successful yeast culture. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (600) : p. 42; 2014.

Abstract: This article answers some common questions received at the AWRI about yeast and provides some top tips for yeast rehydration.

2013


If the grape fits then you can grow it (PDF)

Dry, P. If the grape fits then you can grow it. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (599) : p. 57; 2013.

Abstract: The AWRI often fields queries about alternative varieties and how they might suit Australian winemaking conditions. In this Ask the AWRI column Peter Dry gives advice on how to source alternative varieties.


Understanding the ABCs of CMCs in stabilisation (PDF)

Coulter, A. Understanding the ABCs of CMCs in stabilisation. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (598) : p. 72; 2013.

Abstract: In recent times, the AWRI has received increasing numbers of queries regarding carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and its use in relation to tartrate stabilisation. Some of the questions received and the responses provided are detailed in this Ask the AWRI column.


Vines: is an oldie necessarily a goodie? (PDF)

Dry, P. Vines: is an oldie necessarily a goodie? Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (596) : p. 57; 2013.

Abstract: Grape and wine producers often seek to understand the value of ‘old’ vines. In this ‘Ask the AWRI’ column, Peter Dry providers answers to two questions on this topic.


Snapshot of oak-related queries (PDF)

Holdstock, M. Snapshot of oak-related queries. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (595) : p. 68; 2013.

Abstract: The AWRI has taken many calls on the subject of oak barrels over the years. Here is a snapshot of some of the more common oak-related questions received.


Vary strategies for successful weed management (PDF)

Holdstock, M. Vary strategies for successful weed management. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (594) : p. 36; 2013.

Abstract: The AWRI often receives queries from grapegrowers regarding the use and efficacy of herbicides. This article addresses some of the more common questions asked.


Wine as part of a healthy diet? Australian Dietary Guidelines 2013 (PDF)

Stockley, M. Wine as part of a healthy diet? Australian Dietary Guidelines 2013. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (593) : p. 82-83; 2013.

Abstract: This article summarises findings on wine and health published in the latest iteration of the Australian Dietary Guidelines, launched in February 2013. It includes the summary of a five-year study of older Australians and the impact of low-risk drinking.


Salt in grapes and wine a common issue (PDF)

Longbottom, M. Salt in grapes and wine a common issue. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (592) : p. 28-29; 2013.

Abstract: The viticulture team at The Australian Wine Research Institute often field queries from grapegrowers at the AWRI’s roadshows. This article discusses common questions asked about salt in grapes, including measurement techniques and the impact on wine quality.


What’s that smell – is that Brett? Part 2 (PDF)

Cowey, G. What’s that smell – is that Brett? Part 2. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (591) : 64-65; 2013.

Abstract: There have been a number of queries lately to the AWRI regarding Brettanomyces, or ‘Brett’, in wine, particularly the perception of Brett in different wine styles and at levels close to the sensory threshold. This article answers some of those questions.


What can you tell me about controlling Botrytis bunch rot without the use of fungicides? (PDF)

Dry, P. What can you tell me about controlling Botrytis bunch rot without the use of fungicides? Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (589) : p. 28; 2013.

Abstract: In this ‘Ask the AWRI’ column, Peter Dry discusses various techniques for controlling botrytis, including canopy management, early bunch thinning and reducing fruitset.


What’s that smell – is that Brett? (PDF)

Cowey, G. What’s that smell – is that Brett? Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (588) : 53-54; 2013.

Abstract: With frequent winemaker inquiries about Brett, it is timely to look at this important subject in detail. This is the first in a two-part series on Brettanomyces.


2012


What are the benefits of nutritional analysis and how do I get the most from the results? (PDF)

Longbottom, M. What are the benefits of nutritional analysis and how do I get the most from the results? Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (587) : p. 49; 2012.

Abstract: This ‘Ask the AWRI’ column discusses how growers can choose the appropriate type of nutrient analysis and maximise the results.


Timing of harvest is a key decision for winemakers. (PDF)

Krstic, M. Timing of harvest is a key decision for winemakers. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (585) : 38-39; 2012.

Abstract: In this ‘Ask the AWRI’ column Mark Krstic answers questions on harvest timing and vineyard sampling.


Malolactic fermentation issues explored (PDF)

Coulter, A. Malolactic fermentation issues explored. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (584) : p. 86; 2012.

Abstract: Each year the AWRI’s Winemaking and Extension Services team receives numerous queries regarding problems associated with malolactic fermentation (MLF). Some of the more common questions and responses are discussed here.


Strobilurin resistance to powdery mildew in a vineyard (PDF)

Essling, M. Strobilurin resistance to powdery mildew in a vineyard. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (583) : p. 46; 2012.

Abstract: The strobilurin group of fungicides has been registered for control of powdery and downy mildews for over a decade. However, the recent occurrence of strobilurin-resistant strains of powdery mildew is a matter of concern and necessitates a change in disease management.


Constant observation key to avoiding dilemma of stuck ferments (PDF)

Holdstock, M. Constant observation key to avoiding dilemma of stuck ferments. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (582) : 66-67; 2012.

Abstract: Stuck fermentations are a regular occurrence for one reason or another, and each vintage the winemaking team at The Australian Wine Research Institute field several questions associated with this frustrating problem. Some of the more common questions are answered here by the AWRI team.


Assessing sun-smart protection (PDF)

Essling, M. Assessing sun-smart protection. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (581) : 36-37; 2012.

Abstract: This article discusses several ‘sunscreen’ products which reflect ultraviolet and infrared radiation from plant surfaces, and lists application rates to ensure fermentation and sensory properties are not affected.


How and why identify matter other than grapes (PDF)

Cowey, G. How and why identify matter other than grapes. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (580) : 77-78; 2012.

Abstract: Harvest is usually the time when The Australian Wine Research Institute (AWRI) is asked a range of questions about different kinds of matter other than grapes (MOG) and its potential implications for wine quality. Here are some of those questions from this harvest.


Mixed cost and quality effects from thinning (PDF)

Longbottom, M. Mixed cost and quality effects from thinning. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (579) : p. 52; 2012.

Abstract: The viticulture team at The Australian Wine Research Institute often field queries from grapegrowers at the AWRI’s roadshows. This article discusses using ‘sacrificial’ canes to reduce vine vigour and improve fruit quality and employing bunch thinning techniques to decrease yield and, by way of improved vine balance, achieve better fruit quality.


Rules and regulations on the move (PDF)

Stockley, C. Rules and regulations on the move. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (578) : p. 60; 2012.

Abstract: There has been lots of movement with Australian winemaking and labelling legislation, which is causing a great amount of discussion within the Australian wine community. This article presents some of the issues currently being directed to The Australian Wine Research Institute’s (AWRI) health and regulation information manager Creina Stockley.


Root pruning and covercrops combine to control vigour (PDF)

Dry, P. Root pruning and covercrops combine to control vigour. Australian & New Zealand Grapegrower & Winemaker (576) : 29-30; 2012.

Abstract: In its regular viticulture column, the AWRI offers the latest advice on how to keep Chardonnay growth down, and identify the difference between clones, mass-selection and late-season hedging.